Faculty of Performance, Visual Arts & Communications

CentreCATH

People

The following Academics are involved with CentreCATH:

In this section:

Griselda Pollock

Griselda Pollock

Since 1990 Griselda Pollock has been Professor of Social and Critical Histories of Art and, since 2001, Director, Centre CATH (Cultural Analysis, Theory & History) at the University of Leeds, England. Known for her critical interventions in feminist, social, Jewish and postcolonial studies in art’s histories, her work ranges from nineteenth and twentieth century fields to that of contemporary art and cinema, museum studies and cultural theory Her writings have elaborated a series of concepts with which to think about and perform feminist interventions: Old Mistresses, Vision and Difference, Avant-Garde Gambits, Generations and Geographies, Differencing the Canon. Her current research focuses on the concept of the Virtual Feminist Museum

Within the context of CentreCATH Griselda Pollock explores the challenges of transdisciplinary studies of art and culture, conjugating fine art, histories of art and cultural theory. Her current research and teaching interests focus on Aby Warburg’s theory of the image and time, on trauma and aesthetic transformation, and feminist psychoanalytical aesthetics as well as cultural memory and the Holocaust. Between 2007 and 2011 she was Director of the AHRC research project Concentrationary Memories: the Politics of Representation. She is currently writing a monograph on Charlotte Salomon.

Some recent publications:

Forthcoming

2012 After-images/After-Effects: Trauma and Aesthetic Inscription/Encryption in the Virtual Feminist Museum (Manchester University Press)
2013 Theatre of Memory: Charlotte Salomon’s Leben oder Theater 1940-42

Yale University Press

2012 Concentrationary Memories edited with Max Silverman I B Tauris
2013 Concentrationary Imaginaries edited with Max Silverman I B Tauris
2013 Concentrationary Art with Max Silveman I B Tauris

Books

2011 Art as Com-passion: Bracha L. Ettinger edited with Catherine de Zegher (Brussels: ASA Press)
2011 AlloThanatography or Allo-Auto-biography A few thoughts on one painting in Charlotte Salomon’s Leben? oder Theater? 1941-42 (Kassel: Documenta Notebook)
2011 Concentrationary Cinema: Aesthetics and Political Resistance in Night and Fog by Alain Resnais (1955) London: Berghan Press) edited with Max Silverman

Chapters in Books

2010 ‘Missing Futures: A Paradox for the Modern Museum’ in The Modern Woman edited by Connie Butler and Alex Schwartz New York: Museum of Modern Art
2010 ‘Ecoutez la Femme: Sonorous Questions of Femininity and Fatality’ in Femmes Fatales ed. Catherine O’Rourke, Routledge
2011 ‘The Museum in Liquid Modernity’ in Malin Hedlin Hayden and Jessica Sjöholm Skrubbe, eds., Feminisms is Still our Name: Seven Essays on, Historiography and Curatorial Strategies (Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing) 105-140,
2011 ‘History versus Mythology: Van Gogh and Dutchness’ in Rachel Esner and Margriet Schavemaker, eds., Vincent Everywhere :Van Gogh’s [inter]national Identities (Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press) 49-62.
2011 ‘Alina Szapocznikov’s Melting Bodies’ in Alina Szapocznikov: Awkward Objects edited by Agata Jacubowska (Warsaw: Museum of Modern Art)
2011 ‘What Women Want: Psychoanalysis and Cultural Critique’ inThe Deconstructive Impulse: Women Artists Reconfigure The Signs of Power 1973-1991 edited by Nancy

Articles

2009 ‘The Missing Photograph: Maternal Imagoes in Charlotte Salomon’s Life/ or Theatre? ‘ New Formations, no. 67. special issue Reading Life Writing, 59-77
2007 ‘Art/Trauma/Representation’ parallax 15:1, issue 50, 40-54.
2009 ‘Mother Trouble: The Maternal-Feminine in Phallic and Feminist Theory in Relation to Bracha Ettinger’s Elaboration of Matrixial Ethics’, Studies in the Maternal, 1:1
2010 ‘The Long Journey Home: Maternal Trauma, Tears and Kisses in a work by Chantal Akerman’ Studies in the Maternal 3.www.mamsie.bbk.ac.uk/journal.html,
2010 ‘Aesthetic Wit(h)nessing in the Era of Trauma’ EuroAmerica, 40:10, 829-886.
2011 ‘Moments and Temporalities of the Avant-Garde “in, of, and from the feminine”, New Literary History, 41, pp. 795-820
2011 ‘What if Art Desires to be Interpreted? Remodelling Interpretation after the ‘Encounter-Event’ Tate Papers no. 15 Spring 2011

Contact Details

Tel: +44 (0)113 34 35267
Fax: +44 (0)113 34 37226>
Email: g.f.s.pollock@leeds.ac.uk

School of Fine Art, History of Art & Cultural Studies
Old Mining Building
University of Leeds
Leeds
West Yorkshire
LS2 9JT
UK

Valerie Mainz

Valerie Mainz

Valerie Mainz has been a member of the CentreCATH Advisory Board since its inception. Her research interests have for focus the art and culture of the French Revolution. She has curated two major exhibitions, L’Image du Travail et la Révolution française at the Museum of the French Revolution, Vizille, France in 1999 and, with Dr Richard Williams, Paper, Stone, Flesh and Blood: Transforming Views of Sculpture in French Revolutionary Prints at the Henry Moore Institute, Leeds in 2006. She has studied the interfaces between history and the painting of history, the guises of prints and caricatures, academic art theory and the representation of the Jew in the Early Modern period. Issues of reception and dissemination are also of concern and she is currently completing a monograph on the topic of: ‘Call to arms, gloire and French revolutionary art’.

Publications include:

Gloire, Subversively’ in Juliet Carey, Colin Jones, Emily Richardson (eds.) Charles Germain de Saint-Aubin and his ‘Livre de culs’, SVEC, 2012, pp. 170-199.

‘The Chevalier d’Eon and his Several Identities’ in Simon Burrows, Jonathan Conlin, Russell Goulbourne, Valerie Mainz (eds.) The Chevalier d’Eon and his Worlds: Gender, Espionage and Politics in the Eighteenth Century, Continuum, 2010, pp. 113-132.

‘Reviewing the French Revolution: A Case Study’, in Griselda Pollock (ed.) Conceptual Odysseys: Passages to Cultural Analysis, I B Taurus, 2007, pp. 103-119.

‘Bringing the Hemlock up: Jacques-Louis David’s Socrates and the Inventions of History’, in Michael Trapp (ed.) Socrates from Antiquity to the Enlightenment, Ashgate, pp. 249-275.

‘The Picturing of Jews in History (From Napoleon to Poussin but then not back again)’, Paragraph: A Journal of Modern Critical Theory, 19/3, pp. 205-219.

Contact Details

Tel: +44 (0)113 34 35264
Fax: +44 (0)113 34 37226
Email: v.s.mainz@leeds.ac.uk

School of Fine Art, History of Art & Cultural Studies
Old Mining Building
University of Leeds
Leeds
West Yorkshire
LS2 9JT
UK

Mark Westgarth

Mark Westgarth

Lecturer in Museum Studies

My research interests are focused on the history and theory of museums and the history of the art market and histories of collecting, especially in relation to the agency of the dealer in the 19th century and 20th century. I am particularly interested in exploring the relationships between a discourse (art history) and elements of its formation (the art market). My research has mapped the emergence of the antique and curiosity dealer during the opening decades of the 19th century, a project that placed the functions and practices of the dealer against a broader cultural framework, incorporating the commodification of historical objects and the emergence of a distinctive historical consciousness in the period. In relation to museums and heritage, I am interested in philosophies of history and the meaning of ‘heritage’, and in particular the relationships between contemporary heritage practices and their roles in the construction of the meanings of the past. I am at present working on a number of projects in relation to museum studies that address the interface between theory and practice and how this dialectic can be negotiated in the contemporary museum.

Contact Details

Tel: +44 (0)113 343 9430
Fax: +44 (0)113 34 37226
Email: m.w.westgarth@leeds.ac.uk

School of Fine Art, History of Art & Cultural Studies
Old Mining Building
University of Leeds
Leeds
West Yorkshire
LS2 9JT
UK

Ashley Thompson

Ashley Thompson

I am a specialist in Southeast Asian Cultural Histories, with particular expertise on Cambodia. A sustained focus on classical and pre-modern arts and literatures is complemented by more punctual work on the contemporary period. The Cambodian case is informed by research on the larger Asian context, most notably Southeast and South Asian cultural histories, with a view to theorising Asian politico-cultural formations. My work explores avenues for comparison of “Eastern” and “Western” metaphysical traditions, and the limits of the comparative endeavour.

My research is informed by deconstruction and psychoanalysis, and revolves around questions of memory, political and cultural transition, sexual difference and subjectivity, particularly as revealed, or not, by language and textuality in the broadest sense. Post-colonial critical perspectives have also played a role in more recent work. Objects of analysis include Hindu and Buddhist sculpture, cult or ritual practices and texts, as well as other forms of fine and performing arts. Before taking up academic work in the West (France, the US, the UK), I spent ten years in Thailand and Cambodia working in post-war reconstruction in the fields of education, cultural heritage research and management.

Recent/Forthcoming Publications

Engendering the Buddhist State: Reconstructions of Cambodian History, Routledge (Critical Buddhist Studies), to appear 2012.

‘Mnemotechnical Politics: Rithy Panh’s Cinematic Archive and the Return of Cambodia’s Past,’ in N. Taylor and B. Ly, eds., Modern and Contemporary Southeast Asian Art: A Critical Anthology, Cornell University Press, in press, to appear 2011.

‘In the Absence of the Buddha: “Aniconism” and the Contentions of Buddhist Art History,’ in R. Brown and D. Hutton, eds., A Companion to Asian Art and Architecture, Blackwell, 2011.

‘Théories post-cosmopolitiques: différence sexuelle, vernacularisation et la fabrique de l’Asie du sud-est,’ in A. Berger and E. Varikas, eds., Genre et postcolonialismes: Dialogues transcontinentaux, Editions des archives contemporaines, 2011.

‘Sparrow,’ in M. Segarra, ed., Hélène Cixous: Croire Rêver, Arts de pensée, Campagne Première, 2010.

With E. Prenowitz, ‘Cambodia’s Trials: Theatre, Justice and History Unfinished,’ in M. Cohen and L. Noszlopy, eds., Contemporary Southeast Asian Performance: Transnational Perspectives, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2010.

Contact Details

Tel: +44 (0)113 34 37657
Fax: +44 (0)113 34 37226
Email: a.c.thompson@leeds.ac.uk

School of Fine Art, History of Art & Cultural Studies
Old Mining Building
University of Leeds
Leeds
West Yorkshire
LS2 9JT
UK

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